What Sleeping in on the Weekends Means for Your Health

Clouds

Posted on Monday, September 6th, 2021 at 11:39 pm    

Most people look forward to sleeping in on Saturday after finishing a long and exhausting week of work. You might think you can “catch up” on the sleep you didn’t get earlier in the week by sleeping in on the weekends. However, this need to sleep for longer could indicate a serious problem. If you don’t feel rested after getting the recommended number of hours of sleep, it might be because you’re experiencing interrupted sleep due to a sleep-related disorder, such as sleep apnea.

Research has shown that maintaining a consistent and deep sleep state every night improves heart health, cognitive functioning, and a range of other benefits. Unfortunately, most people admit that they don’t get the shut-eye they need to function at full physical and mental capacity. Additionally, some don’t follow a regular schedule, meaning they don’t go to bed and wake up at the same time each day. This can throw off your circadian rhythm, which is the body’s internal clock that determines when a person feels alert or tired.

Signs You’re Not Getting the Sleep You Need

Your body will tell you if you don’t get a good night’s sleep. The most common signs include:

  • Acne
  • Bags, dark circles, and puffy eyes
  • Weight gain
  • Craving unhealthy foods
  • Increased caffeine intake
  • Irritability
  • New or worsening depression
  • Trouble with memory and concentration
  • Waking up with a dry mouth, headache, or sore throat
  • Compromised immune system

If you regularly suffer from these symptoms, there are some easy solutions that could help. Create a schedule, so you go to bed at the same time every night and wake up to an alarm at the same time every morning. Make sure it’s completely dark in your bedroom, so your brain doesn’t confuse daylight with your alarm clock or a streetlight outside.

If necessary, buy blackout curtains for your windows, keep your bedroom door closed, and turn off your phone notifications, so it doesn’t light up in the middle of the night. You might also need to make an appointment with your doctor if at-home remedies don’t seem to help. A lack of sleep can indicate a medical condition, such as sleep apnea.

The Link Between Poor Sleep and Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is a breathing disorder that causes you to start and stop breathing throughout the night while you’re sleeping. Although several types of sleep apnea exist, the most common is obstructive sleep apnea.

One of the major warning signs that you suffer from this condition is snoring. Other symptoms can include:

  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Headaches in the morning
  • High blood pressure
  • Waking up abruptly combined with choking or gasping for air
  • Sore throat or dry mouth
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Changes in mood

Disrupted breathing while you sleep means your body wakes you up often throughout the night. You might not even realize it’s happening and only find out about this issue from a partner. Constant sleep interruptions mean you’re not getting the rest you need at night, leaving you feeling fatigued during the day. Fortunately, there are treatment options.

Trouble Sleeping? Sleep Apnea Might Be the Culprit

Silent Night Therapy has experience diagnosing and treating sleep-related issues. If you’re waking up feeling sluggish and unrested, sleep apnea could be to blame. Call us today at 631-983-2463 for a free consultation to determine whether you’re suffering from sleep apnea and learn about the available treatment options.