Five Ways to Get Your Best Sleep this Winter

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Five Ways to Get Your Best Sleep this Winter

Five Ways to Get Your Best Sleep this Winter

Posted on Monday, November 1st, 2021 at 8:14 pm    

Consistent quality sleep is rare for many people. Some people sleep in on the weekends after a busy week at work, while others find themselves exhausted all the time from jam-packed schedules. You might treat the summer months as an opportunity to enjoy the warm weather and spend the cold winter nights bundled up in bed trying to catch up on sleep.

Every person is different. Sleep schedules ebb and flow with the changing of the seasons. Although it might seem tempting to hibernate during the winter, you likely have various responsibilities keeping you busy. You’re planning family gatherings, preparing for the holidays, and working so you can support yourself and your family. There’s limited time to rest and recharge.

Unfortunately, a lack of sleep interferes with the body’s circadian rhythm. It can lead to an erratic sleep schedule, preventing you from getting the full night’s sleep you need to tackle your obligations the next day. Poor sleep quality can also affect mental health and cause various medical issues.

Below are tips you can follow to sleep better this winter.

Keep the Thermostat Low

If you live in a cold climate, you might want to turn up the thermostat to keep yourself warm. However, some experts suggest keeping the temperature between 60 and 67 degrees Fahrenheit at bedtime. This is the optimal temperature range for restful sleep.

It might seem too cold for you, but you can use an extra blanket if necessary. Keeping the temperature lower at night prevents your body from getting too hot. If you feel hot, it can disrupt your sleep cycle, causing you to awaken in the middle of the night. Additionally, setting the thermostat at a higher temperature can create dry conditions in your bedroom and lead to respiratory issues.

Schedule a Time to Worry About Responsibilities

Winter schedules can be demanding. Many people feel anxious this time of year and can’t stop thinking about everything they need to get done each day. If you have a long to-do list to tend to, you should set aside time every day to worry about your responsibilities.

Thinking about the tasks you need to complete at the same time every day can program your brain to worry at specific times. Instead of experiencing anxiety all day, you can train your brain to focus on future tasks at scheduled times.

Set aside fifteen minutes a day to feel stress but make sure it’s more than one hour before bedtime. That way, when it’s time to go to sleep, your brain can shut down so you can fall asleep easier.

Wake Up at the Same Time Every Day

Set your alarm clock for the same time every morning. If you wake up at different times of the day, it can throw off your circadian rhythm and prevent a night of restful sleep.

You might have trouble going to bed and waking up at the same time each day with holiday celebrations and other events to attend, but you should try to maintain a steady bedtime. It can improve your quality of sleep, boost your mood, and promote better overall health.

Go Outside in the Morning

Expose yourself to light in the morning. Light exposure supports a better circadian rhythm, whether you look out the window or go for a quick walk outside.

You should also avoid light when it gets dark at night. Dim the light on the screen of your computer or phone while using it. Put your electronic devices away and read a book instead as it gets closer to bedtime. Keeping your environment dark or dim can help your body prepare for sleep.

Boost Your Mood

You can improve your quality of sleep with a good mood. Practicing gratitude before hitting the pillow can reduce stress and promote better sleeping habits. Think about several things you’re grateful for at the end of the day to ensure you’re in the right state of mind. It’s easier to fall asleep and stay asleep when you feel content, and your mind isn’t racing with your daily responsibilities and the stressors in your life.

Contact Us

Silent Night Therapy understands the consequences of poor sleep. It’s harder to focus and can negatively affect your health. If you notice excessive tiredness during the day, it could indicate an underlying medical condition.

Sleep apnea is a common problem affecting millions of adults in the United States. It causes a range of symptoms that prevent quality sleep and can diminish the quality of your life. Our team of professionals has the experience and resources necessary to diagnose your medical condition and advise you about a treatment plan that could help you sleep more soundly.

Call Silent Night Therapy today at 631-983-2463 for a complimentary consultation.


How to Deal with a Snoring Partner

Posted on Wednesday, October 13th, 2021 at 7:53 pm    

Sleeping is the body’s way of relaxing and recharging for the next day. You might look forward to getting a good night’s sleep after a busy and exhausting schedule. You start to wind down after dinner and experience euphoria once your head hits the pillow. Then suddenly, your partner starts to snore, preventing you from falling asleep as easily as you had hoped.

Snoring is a common problem. According to statistics from the Sleep Foundation, around 40 percent of women and 57 percent of men snore. It’s disruptive for the person who shares their bed and is unable to fall asleep and stay asleep. However, it can be extremely unhealthy for the snorer.

When someone snores, it means their brain isn’t receiving adequate oxygen. Their airway becomes obstructed for some reason as they sleep, causing them to gasp for air. This leads to consistent disruptions throughout the night and doesn’t allow the person to get the quality sleep they need to function the next day.

What Happens When a Person Snores?

Before we can dive into solutions for your partner’s snoring problems, you first need to understand what happens when someone snores. The sound produced during snoring occurs when the air flowing through the throat or nose becomes restricted.

When a person lies on their back, their tongue and muscles at the back of their throat relax, obstructing the airway. Total blockage can occur if the muscles relax too much, causing them to stop breathing entirely.

The body’s natural reflex is to cough or gasp for air, waking the sleeper in the process. The cycle of awakening to regain control of their breath and falling back to sleep all night disrupts sleep quality for both people in the relationship.

Common Causes of Snoring

Snoring can happen for many reasons. The most common include:

  • Structural issues – Some people can’t avoid snoring because of the structure of their bodies. Someone with a deviated septum has a more challenging time receiving the air they need while they sleep. The only thing that could fix a deviated septum is surgery, and most people don’t have the finances for it.
  • Lifestyle choices – Obese individuals can carry excess weight around their neck. The fat surrounding the upper airways can interfere with breathing and lead to snoring. Losing weight, especially the fat around the airways, could alleviate this problem and even eliminate the snoring entirely.
  • Obstructive sleep apnea – Obstructive sleep apnea is a common breathing disorder. It causes someone to start and stop breathing repeatedly as they sleep. Loud snoring could be a warning sign that your partner has sleep apnea, especially if you notice them gasping for air as they sleep.

How to Stop Your Partner from Snoring

If your partner snores, you might struggle with daytime fatigue and other problems that affect your routine and overall quality of life. Below are some tips you can use to deal with your snoring partner so both of you can sleep better.

Different Sleeping Position

Inform your partner of the best positions to sleep in so they don’t snore. Experts recommend side sleeping to manage sleep apnea symptoms and reduce the occurrence of episodes.

If your partner can’t comfortably sleep on their side, they could try to sleep on their stomach with their head turned to either side. This allows gravity to pull the tongue and muscles at the back of the throat forward, so they don’t rest against the airway.

The worst sleeping position is on the back. This obstructs airflow through the nose and mouth, resulting in snoring.

Diet and Exercise

Everyone knows how important it is to maintain a healthy weight and eat the right foods for overall good health. However, what you might not realize is living a healthy lifestyle can also reduce instances of snoring.

If your partner is overweight, encourage them to begin a diet and exercise regimen. Losing fat in their neck could reduce the pressure placed on their airways so they can breathe easier as they sleep.

Sleep Separately

It’s not ideal, but if you’ve tried various remedies that haven’t stopped the snoring, you might have no choice but to sleep in different rooms. Although the idea of sleeping separately can be undesirable, it will allow you to get the sleep you need to be at your best the next day.

Seek Medical Care

When all else fails, you can take your partner to a sleep clinic to determine whether their snoring is due to sleep apnea. Alternative treatments, such as lifestyle changes, might not be enough. If your partner snores because of a medical condition, they will likely need a professional’s help to manage their symptoms and episodes of sleep apnea.

Contact Us

If your partner snores and seems not to get enough sleep at night, contact Silent Night Therapy right now. Our team of professionals can determine whether your partner has sleep apnea and advise them about the available treatment options so you both feel well-rested when you wake up in the morning.

Call us for a complimentary consultation at 631-983-2463 or reach out to us online.


What Is the Best Sleeping Position?

Posted on Monday, September 13th, 2021 at 7:41 pm    

Choosing the best sleeping position is about more than just comfort. If you suffer from sleep apnea, the way you position your body could significantly affect the quality of sleep you’re getting.

Even though you might feel the most comfortable in one specific position and can’t seem to fall asleep in another no matter what you do, your preference for that particular sleep position could be preventing you from getting a full night’s sleep. Additionally, your chosen sleeping position could increase how often and how intensely your sleep apnea episodes occur.

Below are the most common sleeping positions people turn to and which ones you should use to improve your sleep quality and reduce the number of sleep apnea episodes you experience while sleeping.

Sleeping on Your Side

Sleeping on your side is the most recommended position for someone suffering from sleep apnea. You can ease some of the symptoms, such as snoring. An added benefit is that side-sleeping can also manage symptoms of other conditions, such as acid reflux.

When you sleep on your right side, it encourages blood flow and maximizes lung capacity. Your best option is to stretch out your body entirely while you sleep. If you curl up into the fetal position, it could worsen your sleep apnea symptoms or increase the frequency of your episodes.

Sleeping on Your Back

If you sleep on your back, you might experience frequent and severe episodes of sleep apnea. That’s because it is the worst sleeping position you could use. When you lie down on your back, the soft tissue and tongue relax towards the back of the throat, blocking the airway. When the brain doesn’t receive the oxygen it needs, it forces a person awake to gasp for air.

Unfortunately, some people can’t seem to get comfortable in a new sleeping position. If you have always slept on your back and failed at trying a different position, you might be stuck. However, there are some things you could try to make this position more optimal for your quality of sleep.

Be sure to sleep on a firm mattress. A firm mattress can provide the support your spine needs. You should also place a pillow underneath your knees to relieve pressure on your back.

Instead of sleeping with the back of your head on the pillow, turn your head to either side. This can prevent your tongue from relaxing and obstructing your airway. Elevating your head can also keep your airway open.

Even if you’re able to fall asleep in a better position, you might find yourself waking up each morning on your back anyway. You could avoid this by surrounding your body with pillows so you can’t roll over in your sleep.

Sleeping on Your Stomach

Positioning your body on your stomach is another good way to manage your sleep apnea symptoms. It’s not the best option, but it’s better than sleeping on your back.

When you’re lying on your stomach, gravity works to pull your tongue and soft tissue down so they don’t block your airway. There’s also less of a chance that you’ll snore if you sleep on your stomach.

You should use a soft pillow and position your head comfortably to avoid placing tension on your shoulder or neck. If your head faces down instead of to the side, you can prevent airway obstruction. Some manufacturers design pillows specifically for stomach sleepers so you don’t have to smash your face into the pillow while you’re sleeping.

Additional Options to Manage Sleep Apnea

You might have tried conventional methods to reduce or eliminate your sleep apnea episodes. You might have even turned to a CPAP machine.

If you’re looking for alternative options, you should consider specific lifestyle changes. The most common include:

  • Avoid smoking and drinking – Cigarettes and alcohol exacerbate sleep apnea symptoms. If you eliminate them from your life, you could potentially alleviate your symptoms and improve your overall quality of sleep.
  • Lose weight – Obesity can worsen sleep apnea episodes. If you lose fat around your upper airways and maintain a healthy weight, you could avoid airway obstruction while you sleep.
  • Exercise – Everyone knows the many benefits of exercise. Managing sleep apnea is one of them. If you increase your physical activity, you improve not only your overall health but also lose the fat that pushes against your upper airways.

Contact Us

If you suffer from sleep apnea and want to discuss your treatment options, do not hesitate to contact Silent Night Therapy. We can review your symptoms to offer a proper diagnosis and advise you about whether oral appliance therapy is right for you.

Call us at 631-983-2463 today for your complimentary consultation.


What Sleeping in on the Weekends Means for Your Health

Posted on Monday, September 6th, 2021 at 11:39 pm    

Most people look forward to sleeping in on Saturday after finishing a long and exhausting week of work. You might think you can “catch up” on the sleep you didn’t get earlier in the week by sleeping in on the weekends. However, this need to sleep for longer could indicate a serious problem. If you don’t feel rested after getting the recommended number of hours of sleep, it might be because you’re experiencing interrupted sleep due to a sleep-related disorder, such as sleep apnea.

Research has shown that maintaining a consistent and deep sleep state every night improves heart health, cognitive functioning, and a range of other benefits. Unfortunately, most people admit that they don’t get the shut-eye they need to function at full physical and mental capacity. Additionally, some don’t follow a regular schedule, meaning they don’t go to bed and wake up at the same time each day. This can throw off your circadian rhythm, which is the body’s internal clock that determines when a person feels alert or tired.

Signs You’re Not Getting the Sleep You Need

Your body will tell you if you don’t get a good night’s sleep. The most common signs include:

  • Acne
  • Bags, dark circles, and puffy eyes
  • Weight gain
  • Craving unhealthy foods
  • Increased caffeine intake
  • Irritability
  • New or worsening depression
  • Trouble with memory and concentration
  • Waking up with a dry mouth, headache, or sore throat
  • Compromised immune system

If you regularly suffer from these symptoms, there are some easy solutions that could help. Create a schedule, so you go to bed at the same time every night and wake up to an alarm at the same time every morning. Make sure it’s completely dark in your bedroom, so your brain doesn’t confuse daylight with your alarm clock or a streetlight outside.

If necessary, buy blackout curtains for your windows, keep your bedroom door closed, and turn off your phone notifications, so it doesn’t light up in the middle of the night. You might also need to make an appointment with your doctor if at-home remedies don’t seem to help. A lack of sleep can indicate a medical condition, such as sleep apnea.

The Link Between Poor Sleep and Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is a breathing disorder that causes you to start and stop breathing throughout the night while you’re sleeping. Although several types of sleep apnea exist, the most common is obstructive sleep apnea.

One of the major warning signs that you suffer from this condition is snoring. Other symptoms can include:

  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Headaches in the morning
  • High blood pressure
  • Waking up abruptly combined with choking or gasping for air
  • Sore throat or dry mouth
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Changes in mood

Disrupted breathing while you sleep means your body wakes you up often throughout the night. You might not even realize it’s happening and only find out about this issue from a partner. Constant sleep interruptions mean you’re not getting the rest you need at night, leaving you feeling fatigued during the day. Fortunately, there are treatment options.

Trouble Sleeping? Sleep Apnea Might Be the Culprit

Silent Night Therapy has experience diagnosing and treating sleep-related issues. If you’re waking up feeling sluggish and unrested, sleep apnea could be to blame. Call us today at 631-983-2463 for a free consultation to determine whether you’re suffering from sleep apnea and learn about the available treatment options.


Why Can’t I Sleep?

Posted on Monday, August 2nd, 2021 at 3:56 pm    

Sleep is an important part of everyone’s life. Your body needs to rest and reset so you can remain focused during the day and prevent a range of health problems. Unfortunately, many people don’t get the recommended hours of sleep because of sleep apnea, insomnia, and other sleep-related conditions.

Even if you get enough hours of sleep but still wake up feeling tired, you might have an underlying condition that prevents your body from reaching a deep enough sleep to recharge your batteries, so you feel energized.

Fortunately, there are solutions you can turn to so you fall asleep quickly and stay asleep throughout the night. Some are natural remedies and lifestyle changes. Others require treatment from a healthcare professional. Diagnosing the cause of your tiredness is crucial to determine the available options and resolve your daytime fatigue.

What Is Sleep Apnea?

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder affecting around 22 million people in the United States. It causes a person’s breathing to stop and start throughout the night repeatedly. Anything that disrupts your normal breathing can wake you up. Once you’re awake, you might have trouble falling back asleep.

You can make an appointment with your doctor to determine if this is why you’re not sleeping soundly.

Try These Tips for a Better Night’s Sleep

If you’re one of the many people who have insomnia, the way you spend your day could be the culprit. Many people don’t realize the impact their daily activities have on getting a good night’s rest. Making even minor adjustments could drastically change how much sleep you get every night and positively affect your mind and mood.

Comfortable Bed

Sleeping well starts with the right bed. It shouldn’t only be comfortable but should also have the correct firmness to suit your body. Some people need a hard mattress due to back issues. Others prefer a softer bed. Find the mattress that works for you so you don’t toss and turn all night while you try to get comfortable.

You also need a pillow that supports your neck and keeps your spine aligned. There are many pillows on the market that can keep you from waking up with a stiff neck or sore back. Investing in the right one means you can avoid any unnecessary pain at night.

Dark and Quiet Room

One common culprit of a poor night’s sleep is falling asleep while watching tv. You might like having background noise, but the sound and flickering light can interfere with your circadian rhythm. Your body might think it’s time to wake up. Spending time on your computer, phone, or tablet just before bedtime can also prevent your brain from preparing to shut down for the night.

Begin a new nighttime routine by putting your devices away and preparing your body for sleep. Read a boring magazine or book, perform a tedious task, or lie down in bed and focus on your breathing. Whatever you do, make sure it keeps you calm and doesn’t get your heart racing.

Reduce Anxiety and Stress

A lot of people can’t fall asleep because of the daily stressors in their lives. Jobs, families, and other responsibilities can cause your mind to race at night when all you want to do is fall asleep. Practicing different relaxation methods and breathing exercises could help you clear your mind.

Try meditating as part of your bedtime routine or practice controlled breathing by inhaling and exhaling slowly. If you have a busy day ahead of you, put it out of your mind by writing a list of the tasks you need to complete so you’re not thinking about it while you’re trying to fall asleep.

Contact Silent Night Therapy

If you’re suffering from sleep apnea or another sleep-related disorder, do not hesitate to contact Silent Night Therapy. Our team can diagnose your medical condition and provide a customized solution for a complete and better night’s sleep.

Call us at 631-983-2463 for a complimentary consultation.


Celebrate World Sleep Day With Us

Posted on Friday, March 12th, 2021 at 4:52 pm    

World,sleep,day,vector,design,illustrationEvery year before the Spring Vernal Equinox, the World Sleep Society celebrates World Sleep Day, an event that aims to educate people around the globe about the importance of enjoying consistent, quality sleep. This year marks the event’s 14th anniversary and will be held on Friday, March 19, 2021.

The theme for 2021 is “Regular Sleep, Healthy Future.” The World Sleep Society is focusing, this year, on the many benefits that regular sleep offers. Getting a full night’s rest positively impacts our health, mood, and overall quality of life and may have secondary benefits, such as helping us achieve our academic and professional goals.

Sleep is essential for healthy daily living, but, unfortunately, many people either struggle to get the sleep they need, or they don’t make sleep a priority in their schedules. Recognizing this, 14 years ago, the founders of the World Sleep Society decided to create a space for healthcare providers to work together to help prevent sleep disorders and to shine a light on the importance of sleep.

This year, Regular Sleep, Healthy Future’s primary focus is getting at the heart of self-care, as it relates to sleep. The year 2020 was one of the most challenging years in recent memory. Even with all that divides humanity, getting enough sleep is certainly something everyone can agree on. Getting quality sleep, however, sometimes requires getting a bit of help from the experts.

What Are Sleep Disorders?

Sleep disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, from health problems to stress in your daily life. Sleep disorders can affect your alertness, focus, memory, and your health. Symptoms of a sleep disorder may include excessive moving while sleeping, feeling sleepy throughout the day, or even experiencing abnormal breathing patterns.

Some of the most common sleep disorders are:

  • Insomnia – The struggle to begin sleeping and/or sleep for long durations.
  • Narcolepsy – Affects the brain’s ability to determine the difference between being awake and being asleep. It shows up as chronic daytime sleepiness and can disrupt executive functioning throughout the day.
  • Restless Leg Syndrome – A sensation of discomfort, often described as twitching or having the need to move one’s legs while resting and sleeping.
  • Sleep Apnea – A condition where breathing is interrupted and long lapses occur between breaths. This limits the amount of oxygen you receive during the night and the quality of your rest, which can lead to significant health problems.

How Can I Get My Best Night’s Sleep?

Following are a few steps sleep professionals recommend to improve your sleep routine and overall quality of sleep:

  1. Use your bed only for sleep. Save work for the office and other recreation for the rest of the house.
  2. Avoid alcohol four hours before bed.
  3. Have a set bedtime routine with consistently scheduled bedtimes and wake-up times.
  4. If you take naps, never go over 45 minutes of sleep during the day.
  5. Have no caffeine six hours before bed (chocolate, tea, coffee, etc.).
  6. Cut out overly sweet, spicy, or rich foods four hours before bedtime.
  7. Exercise as much as possible during the day but schedule it several hours before going to bed.
  8. Make sure your bed and the climate in your bedroom are as comfortable as possible and have good ventilation.
  9. Mute all distracting noise and limit light as much as possible. White noise machines and blackout curtains are good options.

How Do I Participate in World Sleep Day?

You can participate in the event by:

  • Creating an exciting event for others to attend
  • Getting the word out to your local community and media outlets
  • Delivering informational hand-outs
  • Share #WorldSleepDay on social media

It’s an understatement to say that sleep is vital to our well-being. The benefits of achieving quality sleep are numerous, including improved memory, less inflammation, better breathing, and sharper focus, to name a few.

We cannot wait to have you join us on March 19, 2021, to kick off Regular Sleep, Healthy Future.

Contact Silent Night Therapy Today

Do you have concerns about the quality of your sleep? The sleep professionals at Silent Night Therapy can help. We’ll work closely with you to identify the cause of your sleep trouble, whether it’s sleep apnea, general insomnia, or something else. Contact us today at (631) 983-2463 to schedule your appointment.


Exercises to Do Before Bed for Better Sleep

Posted on Monday, November 23rd, 2020 at 7:39 pm    

Stretching before bedIf you have trouble falling asleep at night, chances are that you have tried a number of home remedies to solve this. If drinking chamomile tea, reading a book, turning off all of your electronics, and turning on the fan haven’t done the trick, you might consider some light stretching or exercises.

According to Healthline, one 2016 study found that people who practice yoga or tai chi before bed tend to sleep better. This is because these exercises get your mind in touch with your body instead of lingering on the stressors of the day. Practicing mindfulness has been shown to decrease overall stress, leading to a healthier lifestyle in general. And the first step to improving your quality of life is to improve the quality of your sleep.

Keep reading to learn more about which stretches are best to do before bed.

1. The bear hug

Healthline recommends this stretch because it works the muscles of the upper back, which often get strained throughout the day by sitting in a chair or having bad posture. To do this stretch, stand up tall and straight, and inhale as you stretch your arms open. As you exhale, bring your arms together, crossing over your body, giving yourself a hug. Use your hands to intentionally bring your shoulders forward to stretch the upper back muscles. Hold for 30 seconds and then release.

2. Child’s pose

The child’s pose is a great way to get in touch with your body and regulate your breathing. To do this stretch, simply get on your knees and lean back on your heels. Lean forward, keeping your legs tucked underneath your body and your arms outstretched. Stay in this pose for about five minutes.

3. Legs-up-the-wall pose

This pose is easy to do and helps release tension in your neck, back, and shoulders. Simply lay on your back and swing your legs up so that they are resting against the wall. You can adjust your distance from the wall depending on your comfort. Stay in this pose for about 10 minutes.

Make an Appointment With Silent Night Therapy

If you have tried every home remedy for getting a better night’s sleep but are still having trouble with your sleep habits, it might be time to call Silent Night Therapy. Our sleep specialists can help diagnose any sleep disorder you may have and find a solution that works for you. We can help treat sleep apnea, breathing problems, and snoring, among other concerns. Call us today at (631) 983-2463 to schedule your free consultation.


Teens Lack Sleep Routine During the Pandemic

Posted on Thursday, October 1st, 2020 at 12:13 am    

Pandemic sleep issues for teens

Teenagers are not known for their healthy sleep schedules. But a global pandemic has heightened stress levels, altered learning environments, and challenged teenagers on a social level, as well. These factors combine to make for unhealthy sleep schedules that could leave your teen awake until the early morning hours and asleep until the afternoon. Not only does this irregular sleep schedule throw off their daily routine, it can have an effect on their overall health.

Experts generally agree that teenagers need around 9 hours of sleep each night to function optimally. However, melatonin, a hormone released by the body to help you fall asleep, isn’t released in teenaged bodies until later in the night. This makes it harder for teens to fall asleep at an earlier hour. With demanding schedules full of classes, after-school programs, sports, music lessons, and homework, teenagers could be up until very late at night getting everything done. Even if a teenager has the chance to get in bed early, their brains may not let them fall asleep for a couple of hours.

When your teenager doesn’t get the recommended amount of sleep each night, this can throw off their routines and even jeopardize their health. Sleep deprivation has been linked to a weakened immune system and higher levels of stress, which could lead to conditions such as depression and heart disease.

Support a Healthy Sleep Routine

During the coronavirus pandemic, it is more important than ever to support your immune system any way you can, including eating healthy foods and getting plenty of sleep.

Experts recommend the following tips to help your teenager get a healthy amount of sleep:

  • Do not bring electronics such as phones and laptops into bed at night.
  • Get plenty of natural light during the day to reset your circadian rhythm.
  • Avoid caffeinated drinks in the afternoon and evening.
  • Limit daytime naps to 20 minutes.
  • Read a book, drink warm tea, or take a warm shower before bed.

Get a Better Night’s Sleep With Silent Night Therapy

Teenagers need a lot of healthy sleep each night to wake up ready for the next day, and so do adults. If you’re having trouble getting restful sleep and are waking up exhausted, then you might have a sleep disorder. The sleep specialists at Silent Night Therapy can diagnose your problems and find reliable sleep solutions. Call our office today at (631) 983-2463 or schedule your free consultation online.


What Is Microsleep?

Posted on Friday, August 28th, 2020 at 12:44 am    

What is microsleep?Microsleep is exactly what it sounds like: periods of sleep that last only a few seconds. These short bursts of sleep can happen at any time. You could experience microsleep when you’re at work, driving your car, sitting in class, or watching your kids.

It’s not just an innocent nap; it can be a symptom of a serious health problem. According to Healthline, microsleep is usually a side-effect of more troubling sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea, insomnia, or narcolepsy. Visiting a sleep specialist can help you determine which, if any, of these sleep disorders is causing your microsleep.

You’re more likely to experience microsleep if you’re sleep-deprived, and millions of us are. Approximately 1 in 5 American adults don’t get enough sleep. There are a number of reasons why you might be sleep-deprived, including:

  • Working late nights or overnight shifts
  • Being unable to sleep because of stress
  • Sleep disorders
  • Narcolepsy

Some of the most common warning signs that you might be experiencing microsleep are:

  • Sudden and uncontrollable body jerks
  • Not being able to remember the last few minutes
  • Slow blinking
  • Excessive yawning
  • Repetitive head dropping

Many of the symptoms of microsleep are similar to what you experience right before falling asleep at a natural and healthy time of day. But microsleep can happen at any time and anywhere. This’s part of what can make microsleep dangerous.

Luckily, there are simple ways to treat microsleep. Making small changes to your daily routine could help you fall asleep more quickly and get a deeper sleep. This could include cutting your caffeine intake a couple of hours before bed, turning off your phone, laptop, and TV earlier, and keeping your room cooler. If these changes don’t make a difference and you still experience periods of extreme tiredness during the day, it might be time to call a sleep expert.

Schedule a Free Consultation with a Sleep Expert

Silent Night Therapy is open again and ready to help patients just like you! Schedule your appointment today to discuss any problems you have with sleeping or staying asleep. If you’re experiencing microsleep, you might need treatment for a more serious sleep disorder such as sleep apnea. Consult with one of our team members today to diagnose and solve your problem. Call our office at 631-983-2463 to speak with a sleep specialist.


Surprising health conditions that can be from poor breathing at night

Posted on Monday, January 20th, 2020 at 7:37 pm    

If you suffer from sleep apnea, a condition that causes your breathing to repeatedly stop during sleep, the most obvious health-related drawback is a persistent feeling of tiredness. However, there are a number of other health conditions that may arise if you suffer from sleep apnea or have other sleep-related problems. 

Lower libido

Both men and women who suffer from sleep apnea report lower libidos and decreased interest in sex. This is because disturbed sleep often leaves you feeling groggy and irritable all day. A 2002 study from the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism also suggests that men who experience sleep apnea tend to release lower levels of testosterone at night, which could lead to a decreased interest in sex. 

Damaged skin

If you suffer from sleep apnea or insomnia, you may be at a greater risk of experiencing aging skin quicker than your peers. Fine lines on facial skin, dark circles under the eyes, and dull skin could all possibly be attributed to chronic sleep loss. This is because your body releases more cortisol when it is stressed, such as when you don’t get enough sleep, which breaks down collagen if it’s released in excess. Collagen is the protein in your skin that keeps it looking shiny and healthy. Sleep loss could also decrease your body’s release of human growth hormone, which repairs damages to your skin as you sleep. 

Frequent forgetfulness

“Sharp wave ripples” are the cerebral events responsible for maintaining our memories and keeping them sharp. They also transfer memories to the neocortex, where long-term memories are stored. However, sharp-wave ripple events usually only occur when we are in a deep sleep, so people who suffer from insomnia or sleep apnea may not experience these events as often. 

Increased risk of death

According to the Whitehall II Study, conducted by British researchers Michael Marmot and Eric Brunner, people who sleep five hours or less each night are at double the risk of death from all causes, but especially cardiovascular disease. 

Need to Get Better Sleep? Call the OSA Experts

If you or a loved one suffer from sleep apnea, contact Dr. Brown and the OSA team to schedule a consultation. We’ll help you find a solution that will have you sleeping soundly in no time. Call us at (631) 983-2463 today.